limp


limp
limp, floppy, flaccid, flabby, flimsy, sleazy mean deficient in firmness of texture, substance, or structure and therefore unable to keep a shape or in shape.
Limp applies to something that lacks or has lost the stiffness or firmness necessary to keep it from drooping or losing its original sturdiness or freshness
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collars limp with perspiration

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a limp body that seemed to have been poured into his clothes as if it were sand— Sitwell

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his body was dangling in a most uncomfortable position, all loose and limp, and shapeless— Dickens

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squash-flowers hanging limp as widow's weeds on the stringy stems— Brittain

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Floppy applies to something that sags or hangs limply
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a dog with floppy ears

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foreigners—fortunately scarce—wear floppy ties, long hair and beards— Kinross

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an old lady in a . . .floppy garden hat— Greene

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Flaccid implies a loss or lack of elasticity or resilience and therefore an incapacity to return to an original shape or condition or to keep a desired shape; the term applies primarily to flesh and other living tissues
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flaccid muscles

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a flaccid stem

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now, in swift collapse, he was as flaccid as a sick hound and as disgusting as an aged drunkard— Bennett

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In extended use the term implies lack of force or energy or substance
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the style is ... worthless, slipshod, flaccidWilde

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our flaccid culture— T. S. Eliot

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when a writer thinks clearly his prose itself is sharp and fresh, and when his thought becomes flaccid his words too become limp, mechanical and fogged— Krim

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Flabby applies to something that is so soft that it yields readily to the touch or is easily shaken
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her breasts had grown flabby and pendulous with many children— Buck

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In extended use the term implies the loss or lack of what keeps a thing up or in good sound condition; it often carries suggestions of spinelessness, spiritlessness, or lethargy
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the flabby government which was . . . incapable of defending its own interests— Owen Lattimore

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very few . . . are worth converting. Their minds are intrinsically flabby and parasitical— Mencken

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Flimsy applies to something that by its looseness of structure or insubstantiality of texture cannot hold up under use or strain
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a wooden seat put together with nails—a flimsy contrivance, which defies all rules of gravity and adhesion— Jefferies

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In extended use the term applies to whatever is so frail or slight as to be without value or endurance
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a flimsy excuse

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the story is fashioned of such flimsy stuff that it almost tears apart in the telling— Krout

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Sleazy applies especially to flimsy textiles, but it often suggests, as flimsy need not, fraud or carelessness in its manufacture
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a sleazy dress

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thin sleazy woolens

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In extended use the term may stress lack or inferiority of standards
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a sleazy little gold digger— New Republic

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the sleazier forms of competition— Fortune

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or inferiority of the resultant product (sleazy new apartment blocks, their broken, rubble-salvaged brick unfaced— Flora Lewis) but often its suggestion is one of cheap shabby inferiority
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a sleazy piece of the old, tedious reality— Mary McCarthy

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a stammered, sleazy chronicle, told by fits and starts— Time

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Analogous words: *loose, slack, relaxed, lax: limber, *supple
Contrasted words: *stiff, rigid, inflexible, stark, wooden, tense: *firm, hard, solid: brittle, crisp (see FRAGILE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • limp — limp·er; limp·ing·ly; limp·kin; limp·ly; limp·ness; limp·sy; limp·en; limp; limp·sey; …   English syllables

  • limp — limp1 [limp] vi. [ME lympen < OE limpan, to befall, occur (in a specialized sense, to walk lamely), akin to MHG limpfen, to walk with a limp, OHG limfan, to befall, happen < IE * (s)lemb < base * leb , to hang down, be limp > SLUMP,… …   English World dictionary

  • Limp — (l[i^]mp), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Limped} (l[i^]mt; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. {Limping}.] [Cf. AS. lemphealt lame, OHG. limphen to limp, be weak; perh. akin to E. lame, or to limp, a [root]120.] To halt; to walk lamely. Also used figuratively. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Limp — Limp, a. [Cf. Icel. limpa limpness, weakness, and E. lap, n., lop, v. t. Cf. {Limber}, a.] 1. Flaccid; flabby, as flesh. Walton. [1913 Webster] 2. Lacking stiffness; flimsy; as, a limp cravat. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • limp — [adj] not stiff; weak bending, debilitated, drooping, droopy, ductile, enervated, exhausted, feeble, flabby, flaccid, flexible, flexuous, flimsy, floppy, impressible, infirm, languid, languishing, lax, lethargic, limber, listless, loose, plastic …   New thesaurus

  • limp — Ⅰ. limp [1] ► VERB 1) walk with difficulty because of an injured leg or foot. 2) (of a damaged ship or aircraft) proceed with difficulty. ► NOUN ▪ a limping gait. ORIGIN related to obsolete limphalt «lame». Ⅱ …   English terms dictionary

  • Limp — Limp, n. A halt; the act of limping. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Limp — Limp, n. (Ore Washing) A scraper for removing poor ore or refuse from the sieve. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • limp|sy — «LIHMP see», adjective. Dialect. limp …   Useful english dictionary

  • Limp — est une distribution Linux LiveCD qui permet de transformer votre PC en lecteur multimédia dédié. Voir aussi Liste des LiveCD Lien externe (en) Site officiel …   Wikipédia en Français


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